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Wax On #8 Billie Holiday

Date
Sep 26 2018
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Contact details

Address

The Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay, Temple Bar, Dublin,
E: office@aikenpromotions.com

The Workman’s Club is hosting a series of intimate monthly listening parties focused on sparking fresh dialogues about some of the most influential jazz musicians to have ever lived. In September, Lady Day herself gets a spin.

The Workman’s Club is hosting a series of intimate monthly listening parties focused on sparking fresh dialogues about some of the most influential jazz musicians to have ever lived. In September, Lady Day herself gets a spin.

One of the greatest jazz voices of all time, Billie Holiday's poignant, soulful sound was – and still is – especially remarkable due to her total lack of technical training. Holiday, who, despite being spotted by John Hammond and cutting her first record as part of a studio group led by Benny Goodman, never learned how to read music, and indeed, didn't even make her true singing debut until her teens, when she moved from her hometown of Baltimore to the smoky clubs of Harlem.

Holiday's music career took off quickly in New York; by 1935 she had recorded four sides that would go on to become hits, including 'What a Little Moonlight Can Do' and 'Miss Brown to You.' Over the better part of the next decade, she would go on to record some of the most important works of American jazz music to date. Fuelled by a turbulent private life, Holiday's unique diction, phrasing and uncanny ability to infuse any song with stirring emotion drove a career that stands out generations later as one of the most incredible.

Don't miss this original and engaging deep dive into Holiday's musical catalogue, moderated by Irish Times music critic Cormac Larkin and a special panel of jazz aficionados.

Tickets
€11.20