Ferienhäuser & Cottages

Batty Langley Lodge - Irish Landmark Trust

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Kontaktinformationen

Adresse

Parson's Lane, Leixlip, Kildare,
Ms Suzanne Mulvaney
 +353(0)16704733
 bookings@irishlandmark.com

Batty Langley Lodge is an elegant two storey self catering building with seven stone pinnacles, in Parson's Lane, Leixlip, County Kildare. Designed to be viewed from the River Walk, as part of the landscape surrounding the beautiful Palladian House.

An elegant two storey building with seven stone pinnacles, Batty Langley Lodge was designed to be viewed from the River Walk below as part of the planned landscape surrounding the beautiful Palladian Castletown House. A wonderful hide-away for two.

It is situated on the old Dublin entrance to Castletown House, now a quiet country lane. It is far removed from the hustle and bustle of normal everyday life. A perfect place to relax while still being able to get in to Dublin city within an hour.

This lodge accommodates two people in great comfort with a large sitting room with an open fire, overlooking the river and a kitchen dining room downstairs and a double bedroom and bathroom upstairs. Facilities include a microwave, washing machine, dishwasher, ironing board/iron, travel cot on request, on site parking for one car and a patio with garden furniture.

Thomas Conolly and Lady Louisa inherited Castletown in 1754 and turned Castletown demesne into one of the great designed landscapes of Ireland, visited and admired by both foreign and native visitors until its period of decline in the nineteenth century.

Based on a design for a Gothic Temple taken from Batty Langley's book Gothic Architecture published in 1747, the façade of the lodge was added to the existing rectangular cottage in 1785. Thus the lodge became known as the Batty Langley Lodge. Situated far from the town of Celbridge and on the very edge of the estate, the buildings privacy made it a suitable location for the privileged nobility to indulge their fantasies and escape to the lodge to don the mask of simple farm-wives or dairymaids.