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Glycine Watches

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Contact details

Address

27 Eustace Street
,
Temple Bar, Dublin city centre, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
T: +353(0)16773647
F: +353(0)16770755
E: glycinew@eircom.net

Glycine Watches of Eustace Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 1 stocks a fine selection of Swiss Glycine and Irish Claddagh watches.

Located on Eustace Street, Temple Bar in Dublin 1, Glycine Watches combine tradition and trend in the classic art of watchmaking and modern design. Classic and elegant styling, quality and precision is Glycine Watches’ philosophy.

Established in Bienne, Switzerland in 1914, they have maintained a select line of speciality timepieces. A rich assortment of exquisite mechanical watches, featuring their large-diameter cases are stocked here. The AIRMAN line offering a smart selection of aviator watches to professional and amateur aviators is stocked in this Temple Bar outlet.

Another of Glycine Watches, Temple Bar products is Claddagh Watches featuring a gold plated dial with a Claddagh face and strap with intricate Claddagh designs. Glycine Watches of Temple Bar Dublin is proud of the quality of in store products and its strong reliable after sale service.

The shop is located in Temple Bar which is renowned for its restaurants and unusual shops which line the narrow, cobbled streets. The area was the birthplace of parliamentarian Henry Grattan. Skilled craftsmen and artisans, such as clockmakers and printers, lived and worked around Temple Bar until post-war industrialisation led to a decline in the area's fortunes.

In the 1970s, the CIE (national transport authority) bought up parcels of land in this area to build a major bus depot. While waiting to acquire the land in this area, the CIE leased out some of the old retail and warehouse premises to young artists and to record, clothing and book shops. The area developed an ‘alternative’ identity and a successful lobby by local residents persuaded CIE to discontinue with their development. The area became the city's ‘officially designated arts zone’ and it is still an exciting, atmospheric and essentially very young place. Organisations based here include the Irish Film Centre (IFC), the experimental Projects Arts Centre and around a dozen galleries. There are also centres for music, multi-media and photography as well as a Children's Cultural Centre, an arts centre offering theatre, workshops and other entertainment for children.