Northern Ireland is Game of Thrones territory

Mussenden Temple (Dragonstone)

Follow the three-eyed raven through Northern Ireland, where crumbling castles and ancient landscapes become key Seven Kingdoms filming locations in Game of Thrones.

FORBIDDING FORESTS
FORBIDDING FORESTS

The forests, mountains and moorlands around Northern Ireland transformed into the scenic backdrops for Game of Thrones most memorable moments. It was here that Sansa and Littlefinger journeyed to the Eyrie, Jorah and Tyrion set sail on the Summer Sea together, and Jaime and Bronn came ashore on Dorne.

Tollymore Forest Park, County Down, made its mark as the Haunted Forest, where the White Walkers began their march into the realm of men. These 600 hectares hold ancient redwoods as well as Gothic stone arches – the remnants of an 18th century estate. The ‘bastard of Bolton’ hunted Theon here, and it's where the Starks discover the direwolves. Listen carefully, you might still hear their howls.

Nature was definitely smiling on HBO’s location scouts when they found the Dark Hedges, a haunting avenue of serpentine beech trees near Armoy, County Antrim.

It became the Kingsroad, where Arya disguised herself as a boy to avoid capture. But captured she was, and dragged to the Brotherhood without Banners’ hideout, otherwise known to us as Pollnagollum Cave in County Fermanagh. Part of the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, it's an extensive maze of underground passages that attracts explorers from distant lands.

The gorgeous Shillanavogy Valley, beneath Slemish Mountain in County Antrim, recreated the Dothraki grasslands, when the Khalasar departs Pentos and rides to Vaes Dothrak. Another Antrim stunner is Glenariff. Known as ‘Queen of the Glens’, it’s considered the most beautiful of the nine Glens of Antrim: a plunging valley surrounded by stunning waterfalls and walking trails. It served as the practice ground at Runestone in the Vale of Arryn, where Littlefinger and Sansa Stark watched Robin Arryn’s attempt at duelling.

Another prime filming location can be found in the Mourne Mountains in County Down. These dramatic slopes were the entrance to Vaes Dothrak and are no stranger to fantasy novels – they inspired author CS Lewis to create Narnia. Leitrim Lodge at the foothills of the Mournes became the lands north of Winterfell where Bran first meets Jojen and Meera in the woods.

On the border between County Antrim and County Derry-Londonderry is Binevenagh Mountain, marking the edge of the Antrim plateau and boasting panoramic views from the summit that stretch for miles. No wonder this is the location chosen for the Dothraki Sea far above the city of Meereen. It’s where Daenerys is rescued by her dragon Drogon and brought to his lair…

CASTLES OF THE SEVEN KINGDOMS
CASTLES OF THE SEVEN KINGDOMS

Aside from the fantasy landscapes, Northern Ireland's packed with another prolific requirement for Game of Thrones – its abundance of castles. Dating back to Norman and medieval times, these structures catapult you right into Westeros and have seen a Lannister lion’s share of bloodshed.

Take Shane’s Castle in County Antrim. Built in the 14th century on the edge of Lough Neagh, this ruined castle was the backdrop to the jousting tournament. You know the one, where Gregor Clegane beheaded a horse? Lough Neagh was also transformed into the Summer Sea, where Jorah steals a boat, takes Tyrion captive and sets sail to his beloved Daenerys in Meereen.

High up on the Antrim plateau is Cairncastle, depicted in the scene where Littlefinger took Sansa to Moat Cailin and she made her decision to ally with the Boltons. You can’t actually visit the castle, but that doesn’t stop you admiring its breath-taking beauty from the road (and snapping a few memorable pictures).

Where's your sense of wonder? The greatest structure ever built. The intrepid men of the Night's Watch. The wintry abode of the white walkers.

Tyrion Lannister

Castle Ward, County Down, and its lands were home to House Stark before the Boltons’ seige. Here, you’ll find the crenelated 16th century ruin that doubled as Winterfell and its courtyard. Not far away is Audley’s Field on the shore of Strangford Lough. This is exactly where Jaime was captured – and released.

Fantasy scenes: real places

Think all the action takes place in real-world locations? Not so. Titanic Studios, one of Europe’s largest film studios, is used to create countless interiors for Game of Thrones, such as the Throne Room and the Sept of Baelor. Set in the historic heart of Belfast and the birthplace of the Titanic, these hallowed halls have witnessed more backstabbing – both literal and figurative – than you could swing a mace at.

Slaver's Bay

Slaver's Bay

Carved into the County Antrim coastline is Murlough Bay better known in the Seven Kingdoms as Slaver’s Bay. It’s here that Tyrion and Ser Jorah are discovered by a slave ship and captured.

The Twins

The Twins

Located on the banks of Strangford Lough, County Down, a ruined medieval tower (with some CGI-assistance) morphed into The Twins. It was here the Starks sought an audience with the treacherous Freys to cross the Green Fork.

Winterfell

Winterfell

Winterfell is where the deadly Game of Thrones is set in motion. One of the most iconic locations in the Seven Kingdoms, the 820-acre walled demesne of Castle Ward, County Down, provided a prime location for House Stark.

COASTAL ODYSSEYS
COASTAL ODYSSEYS

Remember Theon pre-Reek? Arriving at Pyke to seek an alliance with Balon? That Iron Island port he docked at is actually a far calmer Ballintoy Harbor in County Antrim. Still used by local fishermen and boatmen, it was here Theon was baptised as his sister Yara looked on. The little harbor is a spear’s throw from the iconic Giant’s Causeway, a natural wonder on the Causeway Coastal Route.

Speaking of Yara, that horse ride she shared with Theon was filmed 12 miles from here – as the raven flies – at Murlough Bay. Shielded by steep rock walls, the path to the sea is scarred with gnarled trees and even has views across to Scotland. It’s in these Atlantic waters that Ser Davos was rescued following the Battle of the Blackwater and Tyrion and Jorah come ashore on Slavers' Bay, only to be accosted by slavers. Today, its sea vistas and wild headlands are some of the most spectacular views on the north coast.

As you creep into Antrim’s Cushendun Caves, which formed over a period of 400 million years, bear in mind that this is the same spot where Melisandre birthed the shadow assassin. She also burned the old gods on Dragonstone, otherwise known as Downhill Strand in County Londonderry, a scenic beach dominated by the elegant 18th century ruins of Mussenden Temple.

Downhill Strand is far from the only gorgeous beach in Northern Ireland. County Derry-Londonderry’s Portstewart Strand boasts miles of golden sand, and this scenic spot is where Jaime and Bronn, disguised as Martell soldiers, approach the gates of the Water Gardens and where the two fight (and kill) some Dornishmen.

Meanwhile, Quintin Bay in Portaferry, County Down is the spot near Castle Stokeworth in the Crownlands where Jaime Lannister goes to find Bronn and persuade him to accompany him to Dorne.

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